Photos of CHAIRSIDE radios ??

Mr Jim Campbell's recent thread on his very nice GE chairside got me thinking about these semi-rare radios. I don't know their history but I think Zenith and their Capt McDonald started the trend which only lasted about 5 years or so (about 1936-1942 or so)
I bought my 1st about 3 years ago on that auction site and as a result, got to meet a collector in Sarasota and picked it up in person at one of their radio events.
That was a 1/2 round RCA and after a going through, its a great sounding radio and perfect for my morning coffee cup or 807 at night. About 6 or 7 tubes, Sw and BC bands and 8"speaker.
They seem to have disappeared after the WWII war. I actually have a few others too and will post a few photos here to get the ball rolling. How about some other's photos too ?
1st up is a side view of a Philco with a car radio installed. I think it was called the 802 with built in shelves. A large radio and large speaker too to use up inventory :
Here's an earlier Philco one with a model 70 chassis, must be from about 1932 or so.
I have seen some postwar chairsides, but their designs were somewhat different, almost like those hotel radios, table sets with legs and an enlarged top. I guess one could call them end table radios as opposed to chairsides since the dials were almost never in the center of the top but on the upper edge of the cabinet.
Best Regards
Arran
answers:
Handsome array of chairsides. I'm trying to recall when chairsides first appeared, but I do know that Philco had their Lazy-X chairside sets in the model 16, and those dated to about 1934., I have one of them.
Stromberg-Carlson and Grunow had a form of chairside in about 1933, with a remote case for chairside control, with the rest of the set in a remote cabinet. By 1936, Chairsides had become popular, and as seen here, some mighty nice creations appeared. Oddly, RCA didn't offer as many of them as did Philco and Zenith, but there were a few.
By about 1940, Magnavox was doing a chairside phono combination, and sold quite a few.
In general, chairsides had smaller chassis in them, because ventilation for the chassis was not too good. The biggest chairside I've ever seen is a Zenith 15 tube model. It must have been a music producing space heater.
I also have a postwar Zenith chairside phono combo, wherein the changer is inside the cabinet, and when a button in the control panel is pushed, the end of the cabinet opens, and the changer is run out on a lead screw. Once loaded, the changer will return into the cabinet if the button is pushed again. Looking at it, you'd never guess that it has a phonograph in it.
The Philco chairside shown is a '42 Chrysler corporation set , and Philco's model number is something like 800 or 801. The 802 was the 46-48 Chrysler set. This is the first Motorola I'd seen in the chairside cabinet. After new radios were no longer being made in1942, a lot of people were thankful to be able to buy these converted auto sets.
Now, a question....the "GE" chairside looks an awful lot like a Motorola of about 1936 vintage. It just doesn't look like a 1935 (RCA built) GE set. Can you elaborate on that?
Following WW II, there were some chairsides, but they just didn't attract the buyers as before the war. So many other varieties of radios were to be had, and then TV stole the show.
answers:
...
answers:
The only chairside I have is exactly like the Motorola one that Bruce shows.
"AC volts and DC volts and little lamps and lities..."
answers:
Here's my Zenith 9-s-244:
John k9uwa/w4
answers:
Mr. Campbell, do you have a model number for your Zenith with the magazine rack??
I might add for anyone wanting to share their collection that it helps to put the model numbers with the pictures in the original post to avoid having three or four additional replies to dig out all the information for the forum.
Iím sure a lot of others do like I do and archive these pictures in our photo albums for future reference. After all, Bunis couldnít photograph them all.
Also Iíve been trying to save the jpegs that Bruce posted, thank you Bruce, but I canít open them even though I have Photoshop and MS software?? Any one know what the problem is with his jpeg format???
Thanks
Denny Graham
Sandwich, IL
answers:
Here are a few chairsides I have.
Zenith
15u246
9s244
12s245
10s452
6s249
Knight unknown model
I have 2 others I do not have pictures of 7s242 & 6s341.
15u246

answers:
.
I like " Chairside" style receivers - - - a lot. That probably explains why I have something over a half dozen of them.
The " Chairside" style or idea has been around since at least 1928 when The National Carbon Co. Marketed the
Eveready model "20."

answers:
The Ash Tray is a nice accent piece to all the radios.
answers:
[quote="Denny Graham"]Mr. Campbell, do you have a model number for your Zenith with the magazine rack??
I might add for anyone wanting to share their collection that it helps to put the model numbers with the pictures in the original post to avoid having three or four additional replies to dig out all the information for the forum.
Okay I edited it with adding the model number. I also added the GE model numbers on the thread from Saturday. I use a Mac and I was surprised to find the pix spread out the screen on a PC. I will try to avoid that too in the future. I am new to picture posting.
answers:
And now for the worst chairside category: