Convert AM Radio to FM

I have a 1970's Gmc Jimmy truck with an AM radio. I am attempting to convert it to an FM radio. I took on this project as my senior project for college ( I am in my last semester of college). I have the general idea down the problem I am running into is when I gut an AM/FM radio I find the circuit board is too big to fit into my Jimmy Radio and then the other problem obviously is getting all the controllers to work properly. Anyone have any ideas? thanks.
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can you cut the board and stack it? Make it look like a sandwhich, if you know what i mean. Could you cut the radio case and enlarge it?
Jeremy
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Talk to Gary Tayman who frequents this group or Google him). He does this commercially. I think they get $150-200 bux for this type of conversion.
Clearly this isn't something you do at home with only a hacksaw as a tool.
My eBay Store:
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HI
I think that Mr. Tayman was telling us of a small 'chip' module he installs in some sets.
I am not sure of the performance of it though.
So, is your AM set already 'gutted', I hope not.
If you inderstand electronics and radio, there is no real way to convert an AM radio's circuitry into receiving FM, without adding a lot of additional componets, coils amps etc.
By the time you do that, you could have bought an AM/FM set made in those years that would fit into your dash.
Atempting to do this is like converting a 6 cylinder inline engine, to a V8 engine. Yeah, you *could* do it, having a multitude of machenery and design, but why? What's the point?
I think you'd get a A+ on your project if you'd look for an FM converter to add to your AM set. This would show the instructor you have some inginuity, and show you want to get the thing done with the least possible time involved, to get the result you want. Such as is in todays world. Cheapest, fastest.
By converting the set into an AM/FM set, what is the purpose? Seeing it is a project, and your goal overall to prove what?
Whatever you do, good luck.
Gary.
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I can't believe that a college instructor would even consider such an assignment, because it's technically impractical as already mentioned.
Your proposed "conversion" by installing the circuit board(s) from an AM-FM radio into the original case is just an exercise in making parts fit into an available space. If you eliminate the original circuitry of the AM radio by removing the PC board, then you haven't "converted" anything except the outer case. In order to qualify as a real conversion, you have to keep most of the original circuitry intact and functional.
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Wow, you guys are really kind of unbelievable. I know this is possible to do, not so much actually converting the AM to an FM, rather converting the radio. I understand that I need to add a circuit board for the FM, I get that, what I am attempting to do is gut another radio, one with an FM?AM circuit board and install it into this radio. The problem being that my old radio obviously does not have enough controllers and that actual hooking up the circuit board to the correct controller. Not only did my college professors accept this project they also thought it was very ambitious. I am beginning to think some of you have no idea what you are talking about. On the other hand there were some people who were very helpful, thank you. but to those who obviously have no idea what I am talking about, back off. I assure you, what I am attempting to do is much difficult then what a boy scout would do. Have a good one.
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OK, your second post is more helpful, you have described what you are attempting to do and what you are using. OK, take AM radio "A", make it AM/FM by using guts from radio "B". You are correct, this is more difficult than a boy scout project, but we could use a little more information before we can really give you some useful ideas.
Are these radios both of the same vintage (ie: 70's)?
Do you have access to more than one AM/FM radio?
Are the metal cabinets similar size?
Are they from the same manufacturer?
What kind of course are you taking? (I am assuming some kind of electronics program).
You mention not enough controllers. Are you referring to knobs, manual pushbuttons, electronic push buttons, or all three?
Is your final goal to have a radio that has had no apparent cosmetic changes? Or, are extra knobs/buttons an optional recourse?
How far have are you along with your project?
Do you have some kind of parts budget?
Answer a few of these questions, and we'll have a better idea as to where we can help, and what kind of things to suggest. This kind of project is probably possible, it may just be impractical. But then again, that is the best way to learn.
Personally, I would suggest going to an auto scrap yard and find an AM/FM radio that is physically smaller than your AM radio, yet has the same (or close to) number of knobs/buttons. This way, you know that whatever is inside the AM/FM unit will fit into your chassis.
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Gosh, people get solid state stuff and put it into cathedrals all the time. You can find FM radios at walmart that are very small 2" square, you just have to have a linkage for the tuning and the volume. If you want to impress your professor, get some acorn tubes and make a FM radio. Acorns are really small and look like TO-39 transistors. They'll be amazed when you yank one out and IT'S A TUBE.
pwnage
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Guys:
I'm puzzled as to how or why such a project qualifies as a "senior class project" for an Electronics Engineering degree or any other possible such similar area of study.
What am I missing here?
Is this an Engineeing class? or what?
Seems so odd that if it "is" an EE degree class that it is not a project requiring some degree of electronic theroy or theroretical re-design.. not just simply a reto-fit mechanical problem... right?
So what kind of serious senior class project is this really?
It's beyond me.. sorry.
WB2eqt

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Thats a neat site, Mike. 35 pictures tell 1000 + words!
-B
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