Crosley Radio in a Keil Table

I have a Crosley radio in a Keil Table that I am working on. At first the client and I were not sure Crosleys were ever put in a Keil Table, but have confirmation from more than one source that they did indeed do so. My question is do I have the correct Crosley chassis for the table? I am about 90% sure it is the correct chassis and there is only one thing that keeps it from being 100%. The only thing that would keep me from being 100% is that the knobs don't align well with the front pane cutout. The front panel appears to be the same as used with an AK except it is upside down relative to the AK.

The model # per Rides is either a 40S, 41S, 42S and one other I can't remember.

Has anyone seen one of these and how well did the knobs fit the opening?

BTW, there are a few differences between this table and an AK table. It is scalloped along the edges and the lid does not lift up. The radio slides in and out of the table.


Audio Antiques
Midlothian, TX
http://home.flash.net/~lfscott/
answers:
Hi Lyndell

Might ask Jim Watson if he's back from Iraq.

answers:
Hi Lyndell,

In the 1920's and 30's, the chassis and cabinets were sold by distributors who assembled them into complete radios. Many cabinets were finished except for a large open area for the radio controls. The distributor would take a standard panel, or custom manufacture one, which would fit the controls and indicators of the radio and mount it in the cabinet, then install the chassis.

I doubt that anyone could say authoritatively that a particular combination was __never__ produced during that period.


73 de Leigh W3NLB | | | |
answers:
Leigh,

Are you saying that the cutout in a standard panel may or may not mate well with the location of the controls? Just looks un-professional.


Audio Antiques
Midlothian, TX
http://home.flash.net/~lfscott/
answers:
Hi Lyndell,

The quality of the subpanel can vary considerably. If you look at the construction of these cabinets from the inside, the subpanel is obvious, usually held in place by a few wood screws.

These may have been provided by Kiel, for combinations which were popular, or they might have been made locally by a cabinet maker working for the distributor. There were different panels, some generic, and some specific to a make and model.


73 de Leigh W3NLB | | | |