Neutrodyne Radio Kit

I purchased a Neutrodyne radio kit long case from the 1920's at Kutztown, PA. It has four sockets for tubes, four wires that include two for battery, one for long wire and another for ground.

Can anyone tell me what voltage batteries these no name kits had ? I would also like to know the number type tube it would take.

Thanks

Tom



answers:
That's almost like saying you have an old shotgun, what shells does it take.

A pic or a description of sockets, pins, transformers. A pic is better unless you already know parts and such.

-Ed



answers:
Tom,

It is somewhat difficult to speculate without knowing what tubes your set was designed for. I am guessing it is designed for O1A's. If this is the case it would take 6 volt for filaments and a typically 22.5 to 45 volt for the detector tube and 90 volt B+ for the remainder.
It is a little unorthadox to utilize four tubes. Typically the 20's TRF sets sets were designed for 5 tubes. Two RF amplifiers, one tube for detector and two audio amplifier tubes.
I am guessing the four wires you speak of are probably for the battery connection. Once again two for 6 volt and the remainder for the B+ voltges. Are there other connections on the chassis for the antenna and ground??
Could you post a picture??


A day without sunshine is like---night
answers:
Thanks D and Ed:

Your input is valued but I do not have a digital camera to take a picture. The set has dials for the detector tube and the amplifer tube adjustments. It has input jacks for the detector, audio 1 and audio 2. The tube sockets are of large diameter and without provision for tube pins on the bottom of the socket. There is just flat metal on the bottom of the socket to make contact with the tube. Other then that the set has the traditional three dials for station selection.


Tom



answers:
Well, that pretty much confirms that the tubes should be of the bayonet pin style, either UV or UX 201A or 301A would be my guess.
(Connoisseur of the cold 807)
answers:
What brand names are on the parts? I bought a Fada 167-A 5 tube off Ebay and they thought it was just a home brew set. It has an engraved panel, by no Fada name, as it was sold as a kit. The model 166-A is a 4 tube kit, see: Alan Douglas: Radio Manufactures Of The 1920's vol #1 page 198.




answers:
Jim:

On one of the parts it says Dubilier for a bypass condenser . I will check the other parts names this evening. The name on the two transfomers is in real small letters. On the front panel sketched in small letters it says this is a kit and not to be resold

Tom



answers:
I purchased an Ultradyne L-2 Kit (early Superhet) at the Kutztown fair this last weekend.

I like that radio fair...



answers:
Sometimes you take your chances on what you want and hope either you or a friend can repair it

Tom



answers:
<BLOCKQUOTE><font>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tom Joerger:
It has input jacks for the detector, audio 1 and audio 2. Other then that the set has the traditional three dials for station selection.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Tom, I'm a little puzzled about how this set could have just four tubes, not five. Here's my theory:

3 tuning dials = 2 RF tubes,
Audio 1 & 2 jacks = 2 AF tubes,
+ 1 detector.

GRAND TOTAL = 5 tubes


**********
Doug Criner
answers:
I agreee with you Doug--strange.

Tom,
Is it possible it could be missing a tube socket?? The standard layout for twenties sets are just as Doug described--two RF tubes, one detector tube and two AF tubes. Certainly a picture would be worth a thousand words. I do understand you do not have a camera.
Does it have three tuning caps?? Does it have three rf transformers/coils??
If it has three coils and two audio transformers your probably missing a tube socket.

Let us know----


A day without sunshine is like---night
answers:
I have an Amrad 4 tube neutrodyne. Some time ago repaired a Freed 4 tube neutrodyne. So why can't there be a poor mans' 4 tube kit neutrodyne? Just one less rf stage...

C



answers:
Could be possible C! Did yours have three tuning caps?? I have never seen one such as that?

Not surprising there is LOTS I have not seen!!

D


A day without sunshine is like---night
answers:
Hello D and Dciner:

D was right this radio has five tube sockets and not four which I stated. It has three tuning caps and two transformers which I can see. It comes with a bypass condenser by Dubilier. The neutralizing capacitor is by Freed Eisemann as is the tuning caps.

I wonder if this a individual parts kit by Freed Eisemann or if they made most of it. I
should read Alan's book on 20's radios to know more.

Tom



answers:
Any name molded into the reverse side of the knobs?



answers:
Alan

Yes there is and will have to use a microscopic glass to read it. I will post it on Friday.

Tom



answers:
Not Freed-Eisemann, presumably, which is in large script.



answers:
Alan:

You may be right I will see tonight. The Freed-Eisemann writing on the other parts was clear and larger. It may be that this was put together by a person on the weekend with various parts from a number of radios. This is my first time with a radio like this and I am not acute with identity.

Tom



answers:
It's safe to say that your set was built from the basic kit of parts sold by Freed-Eisemann in May 1923, which consisted of the three tuning capacitors and coils, and the two neutralizing capacitors. That predates the complete kit and the manufactured models offered in 1924. There's an ad for this set of parts ($21.50) in vol.2, Radio Manufacturers of the 1920s, p.8.

If it had been the complete kit (model KD-50; "KD" stands for Knock Down") some of the other parts would probably have been marked Freed-Eisemann.

If your panel is marked as a kit, it was perhaps sold by a radio store in New York City, using other parts they had in stock.

Nice find.



answers:
Alan:

Thanks for your time and research in solving this. It should be ready to play after the parts have been tested and tubes, headphones, aerial-ground and ac power supply has been located.

Tom